Socially systematic

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Of course, you use social media. You’re reading this blog post and probably have one of your own. You’re on Facebook and Twitter and Tumblr and a few more. But has your approach been scattershot or systematic? Look at these suggestions and rethink — or develop — your plan.

How to Create a Social Media Marketing Plan From Scratch

http://blog.bufferapp.com/social-media-marketing-plan

This writing life

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A friend who used to work in radio and I were comparing notes this week about how writing varies for different media. We agreed that it generally needs to be tighter for radio than print, but that it should be “good” for both.  We also agreed research is important, in addition to word choice and grammar.
We talked a little, too, about how people in various media work. Here’s more on that topic from one of radio’s best.

I’m Ira Glass, Host of This American Life, and This Is How I Work

http://lifehacker.com/im-ira-glass-host-of-this-american-life-and-this-is-h-1609562031

Worth _____ words

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Despite the headline writer’s enthusiasm, I don’t find these photos all that eerie.
Fascinating? Yes, in a picture-prompt sort of way.
Pick one and write 1,000 words — or a novel, or a poem, or a history of window displays.

Eerie and Fascinating Photos of a Completely Empty New York City Taken in 1964

http://petapixel.com/2014/07/23/eerie-fascinating-photos-1960s-new-york-city-captured-streets-completely-empty/

What else is out there?

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No matter what you write, research is important. But beyond knowing background about the people, places and things of your story, it’s good to be able to know what has already been written about your subject.
Just how many histories of crocheting already exist? What else has been written about sparkling vampires or robotic lawmen?
One place that can help with that research is the American Library Association’s Booklist magazine and website.

http://www.booklistonline.com

Paean to pretending

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Meanwhile, back at the keyboard, these writers claim they’ve been inspired  — even trained — in their craft by role playing games like Dungeons and Dragons.
Then there are the rare few who have made their careers in role playing games. Take Matt Forbeck, for one, who has D&D among his credits. 
Really, though, who can argue that a childhood spent imagining and pretending isn’t a childhood fit for a writer?

A Game as Literary Tutorial – NYTimes.com

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2014/07/14/books/dungeons-dragons-has-influenced-a-generation-of-writers.html?_r=0&referrer=

Know more

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Write what you know. We’ve all heard it.
I’ve always believed that meant every job I ever had would give more to write about. So the summers in vegetable packing plants and weeks going door-to-door collecting information for a local census were just writing research.
Any job you have is background to draw on.
That’s what Kathleen Rooney used when she wrote O, Democracy!, a novel based on time she spent working on an Illinois political campaign. Here are some others who worked unusual jobs, some of which they wrote about.

6 Famous Writers Who Worked Odd Jobs – Writer’s Circle
http://writerscircle.com/2013/09/odd-jobs-of-famous-authors.html

By HAL and Robbie

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In newsrooms, we’ve complained about outsourcing local coverage to call centers in India. But here’s a new twist. It’s easy to imagine a program to compile game round-ups and obituaries, but I can’t imagine they wouldn’t still need human proofreaders.

Associated Press Will Use Robots To Write Articles | Popular Science
http://www.popsci.com/article/technology/associated-press-will-use-robots-write-articles?cmpid=pulse

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