Getting it right

I have loved Info Please since I discovered it in high school. Here are links to it and six other online sources for fast facts. And this isn’t on the list, but it’s been my go-to grammar site for years: the Purdue Online Writing Lab — https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/. 7 Great Online Research Resources for Writers http://www.dailywritingtips.com/7-great-online-research-resources-for-writers/

Keep it simple and truthful and …

We sat, legs crossed, around a campfire on a summer night. Surrounded by woods and miles from home, we listened to a story of teens in a car on a country road. We could hear the gravel crunching under the tires as the couple  sped away from the terrifying vagabond. We screamed when we heardContinue reading “Keep it simple and truthful and …”

Character building, part 2

I was still musing about character traits when I found this and I was taken by the potential conflicts between someone who keeps a bug out bag and someone who practices yoga. Prompt: Write about the meeting of the yoga character with a bug-out-bag  character. The Bug Out Bag http://scottekelley.kinja.com/whats-in-your-bug-out-bag-1540881639/1545787206/+adachis?utm_campaign=socialflow_lifehacker_facebook&utm_source=lifehacker_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow

Who are you writing for?

When I first heard about writing for a specific “audience,” I really didn’t understand. Since childhood, I’ve read almost whatever lands in front of my eyes — starting with cereal boxes in the morning. But as I began to understand that others didn’t read as I did, I began to understand audience. This short articleContinue reading “Who are you writing for?”

Classic characters

Anna Holmes writes about two girls — Harriet and Scout — who were not “girly girls.” Who, I wonder, did they grow up to be? Harriet M. Welsch, Scout Finch, and How to Be a Good Bad American Girl : The New Yorker http://m.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2014/03/harriet-m-welsch-scout-finch-and-how-to-be-a-good-bad-american-girl.html