Girls only?

I’ve spoken at a few schools over the years. Perhaps because I’ve visited as a journalist and not a book writer, I haven’t run into any gender segregation problems. But I think it’s something all writers should consider when offering to speak to students. Perhaps there is a good reason occasionally to speak to boys or girls alone, but in this case it seemed unnecessary.

squeetus: No Boys Allowed: School visits as a woman writer
http://oinks.squeetus.com/2015/02/no-boys-allowed-school-visits-as-a-woman-writer.html

Hearing voices

Voice is something I recognize in others, but I’m not always sure I know my own. In part, I attribute that to many years of training in the “neutral” voice of journalism. That’s why I like reading what other writers say about their voices. Here, for example, is David Arnold’s take on it.

Why YA? David Arnold Explains How He Found His Voice and His Readers « musing
http://parnassusmusing.net/2015/02/25/why-david-arnold-author-of-mosquitoland-writes-ya/

Varied learning

Adding both authors and genres we don’t ordinarily read is a great way to learn as writers. I found Sunili Govinnage’s article from The Guardian intriguing.

I read only non-white authors for 12 months. What I learned surprised me | Sunili Govinnage | Comment is free | The Guardian
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/feb/20/i-only-read-non-white-authors-for-12-months-what-i-learned-surprised-me

For another list of black authors, check out http://chroniclesofharriet.com/2012/11/01/great-black-authors-of-science-fiction-fantasy/.